Our singers have mostly come from our connections to community choirs and the “natural voice” movement, where principles of universal singing ability and the right to participate are strongly upheld. We don’t audition prospective singers, however, for this specialist kind of singing, we do require singers to think carefully about their personal suitability for this work.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

       

 

In particular, singers will:

 

  • have the ability to sing in tune
  • preferably have some experience singing in harmony
  • be currently singing (or have sung) in another choir 
  • be prepared to demonstrate their singing qualities.

We practice once a week in Thorndon on a Tuesday morning, 10am-12 noon. We chose a daytime practice as this is the time when we are out singing to patients too. This voluntary work is therefore unsuitable for those who are working full-time or unable to arrange some hours off work each week.

 

We sing in rest homes about once a fortnight, during the day. Requested sings out in the community can be organised at short notice, and we might need to contact you quickly to get a team together.

 

 

Click on this image to download a flyer about singing with us:

 

 

If you would like to sing with us, please This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.. We’ll then introduce you to the process we’ve developed for bringing new singers into Whakaahuru. Once you’ve learned more about how we operate, and whether this feels right for you, we’ll welcome you to come to our weekly practices further to explore our mutual “fit”. It takes time to get to know each other, and prospective singers will need to make a commitment to be involved for a period of time before there is a possibility of attending request sings.

 

 

 

I’ve learnt that this type of singing is a privilege. It’s a truly special experience

 

for us to be there with the gift of song at the end of someone’s journey. We’re

 

giving our music to soothe and ease the way for the person dying, and they

 

and their family are allowing us to be there, opening their hearts and ears.”

 

 

Every sing can bring up emotions, but I still want to do this – I want to sing

 

for others at their bedside, providing comfort and support”.

 

Members of Whakaahuru – The Gentle Singers